Explore the Greater Toledo History Trail. I am.

If you know me, then you know my interest in nostalgia and my passion for Toledo history. So,  you can imagine how my interest was piqued when I heard about the a new project promoted by the Toledo History Museum – the Greater Toledo History Trail.

Ted Long from the Toledo History Museum took some time with me to discuss the Trail, which he calls an adventure, “People will have a real blast as they explore our area’s historic sites and museums but they’ll also gain a new appreciation for the Toledo story. ”

There are nine stops along the History Trail that offer”amazing history journeys.” The first step is to go online and print your history travel passport. Then hit the trail to the Toledo Police Museum, the Toledo Firefighters Museum, the Wolcott Heritage Center, the Local History Department at the Toledo Lucas County Public Library, Spafford House Museum, Sylvania Historical Village, Brandville School & Museum Complex, the National Museum of the Great Lakes and the Toledo History Museum.

While you may start the Trail at any of the nine locations, Ted suggests starting with the Toledo History Museum at 2001 Collingwood at the corner of Woodruff. I’ve been to most of the locations already. My favorite? I think I might be leaning toward the Toledo Firefighters Museum.

 

How do we find out what Facebook knows?

There are few things in life that are certain, but I feel fairly certain you will be surprised by what you learn Facebook has archived about you.  And it all dates back to the very first day you opened your Facebook account. All the posts. All the photos. The books you like to read. And who on Facebook has identified  you as a family member. And wait until you see all the phone numbers collected in your archive!

Want to see for yourself? Here’s what to do.

  • On your Facebook page, click on the  downward-pointing arrow at the top right corner. Select Settings.
  • Click on the link that says “Download a copy of your Facebook data.”
  • Click the Start My Archive link.
  • Facebook will then send you an email to let you know when the zip file with your archive is ready. Make sure that when you extract the files they all go into the same folder. Click on the “Index” page and your web browser will open with a mini website with all your stuff as links under your profile photo.

Just remember, your entire life on Facebook is there! So if there were any embarrassing posts or visits you would rather not share again I might suggest doing your browsing through the archive in private.

Close it! Snap it! Zip it!

Safety caps on our medicine bottles are child resistant, not child proof.

That fact was hammered home multiple times in an interview I recently had with Lori Dixon, the president of Great Lakes Marketing in Toledo. She is also, this year, chairing the national Poison Prevention Week campaign. And I might also mention, in the interest of full disclosure, she is my sister.

Her firm has been testing safety caps for years. The goal is to deter.

Child resistant means the safety cap has been tested with 80 percent of the children tested between the ages of 3 1/2 and 4 1/4 years of age could not open it in ten minutes, she told me. “It’s designed to give parents ten minutes to find your child, take away whatever your child has, and put it where the child cannot get it.”

But, for that safety cap to be child resistant,  she reminds us it must be used correctly to engage the safety feature. So that brings us to the slogan this year for Poison Prevention Week:  Close it! Snap it! Zip it!

 

 

CommUNITY Film Fest will inspire

As many of you know, in addition to being the morning news voice on several Toledo radio stations, I have managed an alter ego as the Public Information Manager for the Lucas County Board of Developmental Disabilities. One of the most rewarding aspects of the job has been my ability to witness first hand how individuals who had once been shunned into segregated settings have become successful in their endeavors in the community.

Day after day they are breaking down the attitudinal barriers that have stood in the way of full access to employment, housing and social activities.

Sunday, we all will have a chance to bear witness to inspiring stories of how people with developmental disabilities are replacing negative attitudes with awareness and understanding. The fourth annual CommUNITY Film Festival features amateur videos, made by individuals with disabilities, that really do “challenge our  assumptions and enhance respect for individuals with disabilities.”

The CommUNITY Film Fest is free on Sunday, March 4, at the Ohio Theater in Toledo on Lagrange.

House approves controversial changes to the ADA

Disability rights activists are very concerned after the U.S. House approved legislation that makes a major modification to the Americans with Disabilities Act. House Bill 620 would require people facing accessibility barriers at public businesses to provide written notice of their concerns. The publication Disability Scoop says concerns could include a lack of wheelchair ramps, special parking or bathroom facilities. Businesses would have up to 60 days to respond and then an additional 60 days to begin improvements.

Supporters of the legislation say they are trying to address frivolous lawsuits around ADA compliance.

But advocates for people with disabilities say businesses could ignore accessibility issues unless there is a complaint. That would be akin to erasing gains achieved in the 27 years since the ADA was written into law.

The Amalgamated Transit Union, in a letter to Congress, said “the legislation would subject people with disabilities, and only people with disabilities, to a burdensome bureaucratic procedure to gain access to certain public accommodations.

“Human dignity and civil rights do not allow us to single out and subject people with disabilities to waiting periods and red tape to gain entrance to stores, restaurants, schools, theaters, night clubs, hospitals and offices that are open and accessible to all others without delay or hindrance.”